Sunday

Growing Moss on Garden Pots

Mossed PotI've already written about my love for repurposing objects like bowls, pots and pans as plant containers. One way to integrate these finds into the garden is to encourage a natural layer of moss to grow on them. This always works best where you have a shady spot to keep the pot once it's sporting a nice mossy finish.

Recipe for Adding Moss to Pots

1/2 cup of garden moss (This acts like a seed starter.)
1 container plain yogurt
12 oz. can of beer
2 tsp granulated sugar
1 cup buttermilk

Moss Pots - Directions

Combine ingredients and use a blender to incorporate. You want a soupy texture.

Brush the mixture on with a soft bristle brush or sponge brush. Be generous.

I find that highly textured pots work best.

Keep your freshly "painted" pot moist. One good way is to place it in the shade and spritz it with a pump sprayer filled with water (or the garden hose) a couple of times a day until you get the desired effect. You can also do this with statuary or anything else you want to look like a long time garden survivor.

15 comments:

  1. Hi there - I love your blog! I have two questions about this moss thing.

    1. Can garden moss (starter) be purchased at garden stores, and/or can you grind up moss from an existing patch?

    2. Will it survive the winter in zone 7-8?

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  2. Hi Elizabeth:

    I don't think I've seen moss for sale by itself in a garden store. I just use little clumps from around my faucets and downspouts.

    Zones 7-8 might be a problem for growing moss year round. You might be able to cheat and build a protected shelter that could keep temps warmer and preserve some humidity.

    It depends on the type of moss you're using too. Native mosses to your area may be able to take some rough treatment and still come back when the temperatures climb and they start experiencing conditions that are more to their liking.

    In an extremity, you'll start a nice mossy spot on your pot and even if it dies back, the dry, green patches will still look pretty nice.

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  3. Hi! I've just discovered this blog and I think it's wonderful and very handy. I've just started growing a few herbs in the garden as a way of passing my time and I'm so proud of myself now! No doubt I'll be checking your blog from time to time to see if I can get any useful tips!

    Congratulations!

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  4. Dawsr,

    Welcome, and if you can't find the answer to a question, just drop me a line.

    Cheers,

    Sara

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  5. Anonymous12:51:00 PM

    I also enjoy your blog, I found it a couple of months ago and have been reading it. Thanks, Michele

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well, thank you so much you your kind words. I enjoy it when people leave comments and share their experiences.

    Writing can be a lonely pastime, and being able to chat about herbs, crafts and cooking with visitors makes my day.

    Cheers,

    Sara

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  7. You have a beautiful and informative blog. I'm checkout out all things container gardening, since we have switched our gardening efforts to self-watering container gardening, due to our very sandy soil here in Central Florida. We are having fantastic results with our fall planting, as you can see from our photos.

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  8. Digger,

    Really nice self-watering container gardening entry via your link. I like to use deep dishes and a wicking system for some of my container plants. For outdoor pots, I make water reservoirs out of two liter soda bottles with sponges to regulate water flow.

    Good luck and great gardening.

    Sara

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  9. And those container gardening pots do well with the vermicompost mix and liquid worm fertilizer for adding to the water. This is a beautiful blog, btw. Appreciate the effort. This "moss on pots" idea is a great way to beautify the garden. Thanks

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  10. Anonymous6:39:00 PM

    Hi,
    I was just wondering if anyone knows how long it actually takes for the moss to start looking mature after spreading the moss-slurry mixture on the desired place. Thanks.

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  11. Hi,

    About moss on garden post. The time it takes to get a nice head of moss on a pot seems to have a lot to do with the humidity and ambient temperature. You should count on a few weeks for a nice furry finish.

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  12. Anonymous10:49:00 AM

    Hi,

    How long will the moss last on the pot? In other words, what should I do with it over the winter? Will the moss die and then I'll have to start all over again in the spring? Thanks!

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  13. Hi,

    I don't know where you live, but if your area experiences a hard frost or snow over the winter, the moss probably won't make it till spring. Sometimes moss can look pretty unhappy and still come back when temps increase. If you have a greenhouse, you may be able to baby it through the rough months. Otherwise, this is probably a spring project for you.

    Sara

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  14. I'm not super familiar w/ blogging, just what I encounter while pursuing my Pinterest addiction... BUT this is certainly one of my favorite blog encounters! Your info is straight forward & accurate, everything is organized & accessible. The planting season is just getting started here in WI (a couple weeks before I can safely get things in the ground) and I am anxiously waiting to try this moss trick as well as some of your other wonderful ideas! :D Thank you for sharing your knowledge with everyone!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Ginny,

      Blogs (and bloggers) have lots to offer. Google is consistently kind enough to include us in their search results. Please come back and visit again.

      Sara

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